Why does my violin sound bad? – Beginning Violin Notes

For the sake of simplicity, let’s look at a handful of common complaints that people have:

The sound of the violin is dull

My violin sounds bad because my teacher was bad

My instrument sounds bad because you are bad

Why do certain sounds have a distinctive sound?

One of the most common reasons for a violin player to have a sound that is not pleasing to the ear is because of what we call in music-speak a resonance.

Reactivity: A violin’s resonance is a characteristic sound caused by the sound coming through the strings when a violin is played. The sound of the violin vibrating causes it to vibrate in the same frequency and range of a violin played by a skilled player over long periods of time. A string vibrating the “same” length as a violin has the same pitch and, consequently, the same resonance.

A violin’s resonance is a characteristic sound caused by the sound coming through the strings when a violin is played. The sound of the violin vibrating causes it to vibrate in the same frequency and range of a violin played by a skilled player over long periods of time. A string vibrating the “same” length as a violin has the same pitch and, consequently, the same resonance. Purity or high string tension: A string having a high string tension (sometimes referred to as “tightness”) produces a resonance in which the strings vibrate in the same frequency range that the violin does. Conversely, the string having a low string tension (sometimes referred to as “looseness”) doesn’t change the number of frequencies it vibrates.

Now, let’s take a closer look at what occurs when a violin is played with a string having certain resonances.

What’s happening when a string vibrates with a certain vibration?

Reactive string vibration

The sound of a piano string (often referred to as its low-frequency (LF) component) is similar to that produced by the violin’s sound (though the violin itself produces more of a high-frequency LF component). In fact, there tends to be a slight increase in the frequency of LF component after a finger-twisting motion causes the strings to vibrate in a particular frequency range.

The most common occurrence of a vibrating vibrating string is the low-frequency (LF) component produced by a bass guitar string, which has a slightly higher frequency than that of the violin.

The low-frequency portion

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